IDSA News - June 2016
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FDA Alerts Health Facilities of M. Chimaera Due to Heater-cooler devices; CDC Continued Updates on Zika Testing

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently released a Safety Communication providing recommendations for facilities and staff using heater-cooler devices due to reports of US patients infected with Mycobacterium chimaera. 

 
The CDC continues to provide the most up-to-date guidance for testing for Zika virus infection using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR). Thank you to all members who participated in our survey regarding IDSA’s efforts to keep you informed of developments in the Zika virus outbreak. Your feedback is critical to our work. If you missed the survey and would still like to provide feedback, please find a user feedback box, “Did you find what you were looking for?” in the bottom left corner of the Zika Resources page on our website
 
IDSA offers two email services to help members stay informed of updates from FDA and CDC. Content includes a range of topics, including drug warnings, recalls, and outbreak investigations. Recent alerts have included: 
 
CDC Recommendations for Subsequent Zika IgM Antibody Testing (CDC Alert, 6/21/2016) 
 
Best Practices for Using PCR to Diagnose Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis and Identify Serotype or Serogroup (CDC Alert, 6/17/2016) 
 
Alert to U.S. Healthcare Facilities: First mcr-1 Gene in E. coli Bacteria found in a Human in the United States (CDC Alert, 6/13/2016) 
 
Stӧckert 3T Heater-Cooler System by Sorin Group Deustchland GmbH: Safety Communication - Reports of Mycobacterium Chimaera Infections (FDA Alert, 6/1/2016) 

CDC releases interim guidance on Zika testing and interpretation of results (CDC Alert, 6/1/2016)  
 
Is Your Facility Experiencing Antibiotic Shortages? IDSA members are urged to report drug shortages directly to FDA and to copy IDSA staff at schang@idsociety.org.

Guidelines Survey: Please Take 10 Minutes to Share Your Feedback

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One of IDSA’s strategic priorities is to produce useful, timely, and relevant guidelines. The Society needs your input to enhance our guideline development process to facilitate timely, up-to-date clinical practice guidelines for the Society's membership and others. 

 
Please click here to take IDSA's guidelines survey. This will require less than 10 minutes of your time but will provide key guidance so that the Society can be responsive to your clinical needs.

Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs via Telehealth

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IDSA has updated its position statement (PDF) on the use of telehealth and telemedicine in the practice of infectious diseases to include the use of telehealth technologies to administer and participate in antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs). The move supports one of the Society’s strategic priorities: To promote ID leadership in antimicrobial resistance efforts and antimicrobial stewardship. 

 
Given that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released the Conditions of Participation proposed regulations, which includes a provision that would require Medicare-participating hospitals to have ASPs, it is likely that the demand for infectious disease physicians will be on the rise. Using telehealth technologies will enable hospitals to have access to ID physicians when none were previously available. 
 
Additional resources on telehealth and telemedicine can be found on the IDSA website.

IDSA Webinar Explains CMSís Proposed New Payment Program

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Even if you missed IDSA’s June 7 webinar, you can still learn about Medicare’s proposed regulation for a new payment program for physician services—and what it means for ID physicians. 

 
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently published a proposed rule for payment reform changes as mandated by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) of 2015. The proposed regulation (PDF) outlines the requirements for physicians to participate in the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), a new program required by MACRA. MIPS will be based on quality, resource use, clinical practice improvement, and EHR use, taking the place of stand-alone programs such as the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), the Value-based Payment Modifier, and the Meaningful Use Program.

Find out what you need to know about the proposed implementation parameters and the effect the new MIPS program will have on ID physicians. A recording of the webinar, held with Hart Health Strategies, is now available on the IDSA website.

IDSA Continues to Drive Legislative Progress on Antimicrobial Resistance

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IDSA and the Pew Charitable Trusts hosted a June 9 congressional briefing featuring IDSA Treasurer Helen Boucher, MD, FIDSA, and Lord Jim O’Neill, Chair of the UK Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Review. The briefing publicized the UK AMR Review’s final report (PDF), which echoed key IDSA recommendations for incentivizing antibiotic and diagnostics research and development (R&D); strengthening stewardship, surveillance and data collection in human and animal health; and investing in the ID workforce. 

 
Dr. Boucher highlighted the central role of ID physicians in combating resistance and IDSA legislative proposals to spur antibiotic and diagnostic R&D, including the Limited Population Antibacterial Drug (LPAD) bill to allow antibiotics for the most highly resistant pathogens to be studied in smaller clinical trials and approved only for the patients who need them most, and the Reinvigorating Antibiotic and Diagnostic Innovation (READI) Act to provide a tax credit for the most urgently needed new antibiotics and rapid diagnostics. You can support this effort by contacting your congressional representatives with a prepared IDSA message
 
The House Energy and Commerce Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee held a June 14 hearing on progress in the US response to antibiotic resistance, featuring updates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA). IDSA also briefed (PDF) committee staff. 
 
The Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria (PACCARB) held a June 21-22 meeting (PDF) to discuss incentives for antibiotics, diagnostics, vaccines and other therapeutics, as well as antibiotic resistance in agriculture and environmental health. IDSA submitted comments to PACCARB (PDF) and the Administration (PDF). IDSA Past President Martin Blaser, MD, FIDSA, chairs the PACCARB, and other IDSA members serving on the PACCARB include Dr. Boucher, Angela Caliendo, MD, FIDSA; Sara Cosgrove, MD, FIDSA and Robert Weinstein, MD, FIDSA.

Zika Funding Remains in Limbo

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House and Senate negotiators continue to try to find a compromise bill to address the Zika virus. Back in February, President Obama requested $1.9 billion in emergency supplemental funding to address the disease both in Zika-endemic countries and within the United States. A Senate-approved bill would provide $1.1 billion to address Zika. The Senate bill does not cut elsewhere in order to offset Zika funding. A House-approved bill would provide only $622 million, which would be offset by diverting funding from the Ebola response and other public health priorities. A compromise bill that later emerged would have provided the Senate’s figure of $1.1 billion with offsets pushed by the House. President Obama threatened to veto the bill and it was ultimately voted down in the Senate on June 28. IDSA and other health groups are now calling on the House and Senate to restart negotiations.

 
IDSA has joined with other health groups to urge Congress to immediately advance President Obama’s request for emergency Zika funding. The Society has participated in congressional visits and weekly White House strategy meetings, and IDSA members have sent nearly 600 letters to Capitol Hill in support of the emergency funding request. 
 
In letters to Congress and media outreach, IDSA and other health groups have underscored the urgent need to provide new resources to address Zika right away, as opposed to delaying and repurposing funding intended to address other important public health threats. Historically, emergency supplemental spending has not required offsets. 
 
The requested funding would increase international and domestic capacity for surveillance; expand the Field Epidemiology Training Program, laboratory testing, and healthcare provider training; accelerate research and development for medical countermeasures, including vaccines and diagnostics; provide support for vector control and other preventive activities; and provide services for infected and at risk pregnant women and their infants.

Senate Bill Would Increase Funding for Antibiotic Resistance, But Impose Cuts Elsewhere

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The Senate committee that oversees federal spending has approved a bill for health programs that would bring good news and bad news for ID. 

 
The committee recommended a Fiscal Year 2017 increase of $2 billion (+6.2% over FY 2016) for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and a decrease of $118 million (-1.6% from FY 2016) for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 
 
The committee recommended a slight increase of $43 million for antimicrobial resistance programs, which is a positive development for implementation of the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, building on a $380 million increase provided last year and bringing the total federal expenditure in this area to nearly $1 billion. 
 
The bill largely flat funds programs in the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention as well as in the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. However, the bill recommends cuts to CDC sexually transmitted infections programs as well as tuberculosis efforts of 3.2% and 3.5% respectively. 
 
The committee’s bill also included a provision, supported by the advocacy of nearly 500 IDSA members, which would examine the evaluation and management billing codes used to reimburse physicians through Medicare to make certain that proper value is assigned. 
 
The House of Representatives is expected to produce its version of a health spending bill before the chamber recesses for the summer in mid-July. IDSA will continue its advocacy in the House to secure robust funding for infectious diseases programs.

HIVMA Endorses the Equality Act

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HIVMA lent its support last month to the Equality Act, a bill to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation. In his letter of support (PDF) for this federal legislation, HIVMA Chair Carlos del Rio, MD, FIDSA, noted that stigma and discrimination remain a challenge in diagnosing individuals with HIV infection, and getting them linked to and retained in care. In the face of a troubling wave of anti-LGBT bills that have been filed by state legislators across the country, the Equality Act would defend and protect the basic rights of Americans regardless of their gender orientation or sexual identity. A brief recently released by The Fenway Institute  (PDF) reports that as of February 2016, more than 175 anti-LGBT bills had been filed in 32 states. You can encourage your legislators to co-sponsor the Equality Act by visiting the IDSA/HIVMA Action Center.

Science Speaks Covers UN Meeting on Ending AIDS

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Science Speaks, the official blog of the IDSA Center for Global Health Policy, covered the 2016 United Nations High-Level Meeting on Ending AIDS in New York June 8-10, and reported on: 

 

IDWeek Mentorship Program

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Get inspired to be a part of the IDWeek Mentorship Program! Learn from Carlos del Rio, MD, FIDSA, the unique opportunity current infectious disease specialists have within the IDWeek Mentorship Program to influence and connect with young doctors, and learn from Sonali Advani, MD, MPH, how being a mentee has positively impacted her decision to become an infectious disease specialist.

    
Click on a photo above to learn more about being a mentor or mentee.
 
Mentors and Mentees interested in participating in the program should indicate interest during their registration for IDWeek 2016. Begin a registration now.  For more information about the program please email foundation@idsociety.org.
 
Funding for the IDWeek mentorship program is provided by the IDSA Education and Research Foundation. Make a donation today and help develop the new generation of ID specialists.
 
 

IDSA Foundation Offers Three Research Awards in 2016

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The IDSA Education and Research Foundation is pleased to offer three research awards in 2016. Our goal is to support promising young researchers who may not otherwise find funding as federal and other institutional research support becomes more difficult to obtain. 

 
2016 Young Investigator Awards 
  • Pfizer Young Investigator Award in Vaccine Development 
  • IDSA Young Investigator Award in ID 
  • IDSA Postdoctoral Fellowship Award in ID 
Who should apply: 
  •  Candidates who have completed an ID fellowship within the last four years 
  • Candidates currently enrolled in an accredited ID fellowship 
For more information or to submit an application visit http://www.idsociety.org/IDSA_Research_Awards/ 
Application Deadline: July 15, 2016

HIVMA Medical Student Program Aims to Inspire Careers in HIV

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Sixteen medical students have been selected from across the US and Canada to receive funding for clinical learning and research projects through the HIVMA Medical Student Program. Housed within the IDSA Education and Research Foundation, the program is one of many initiatives that support IDSA’s strategic priority of attracting the best and brightest students to careers in ID and HIV.

 
The program supports work in local and overseas settings and includes projects as diverse as an evaluation of risk factors for tuberculosis among HIV patients, an analysis of microeconomic benefits of treating HIV, and the development of a decision-making tool to guide clinicians through treatment choices in patients with HIV drug-resistance. The awardees receive mentorship from HIVMA members at their institutions, free membership to HIVMA and IDSA, and a stipend of $3,500 per year for up to three years. 
 
The HIVMA Medical Student Program is supported by independent grants from ViiV Healthcare and the Gilead Foundation. More information on the program is available online
 
2016 HIVMA Medical Student Program Awardees: 
 
Colleen Walsh Lang, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine. "Children Living with HIV/AIDS in Uganda: Managing Biomedical and Social Consequences." MENTOR: Bradley Stoner, MD, PhD, FIDSA 
 
Jesús Luévano, Harvard Medical School. "Impact of HIV-Associated Changes in the Gut Microbiome on Disease Progression." MENTOR: Douglas S. Kwon, MD, PhD 
 
Sarah Rutstein, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "Cost-effectiveness of Treating Depression to Improve HIV Care Outcomes in Malawi." MENTOR: Mina C. Hosseinipour, MD, MPH 
 
Sunaina Kapoor, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "Development and Implementation of an Interactive Decision Support Tool for Anti-retroviral Therapy Selection (ART) in HIV Patients." MENTOR: Maunank Shah, MD, PhD 
 
Andrew Flynn, University of Minnesota. "Determinants of HIV Prevalence Changes in Uganda 2004-2011." MENTOR: David Boulware, MD, MPH, CTropMed 
 
Carlos Rodriguez-Russo, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. "The Impact of Enrollment in Targeted Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services on Hospitalization and Institutional Care Use Among Aging HIV+ Patients." MENTOR: Ira Wilson, MD, MSc 
 
Clara Van Ommen, University of British Columbia. "Exploring the Triad of Telomeres, HIV and Ovarian Aging." MENTOR: Melanie Murray, MD, PhDNishant Munugala, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. “The Impact of Health Numeracy on Attitudes Toward PrEP for HIV Prevention." MENTOR: Susanne Doblecki-Lewis, MD 
 
Rustin Zomorodi, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "Increasing PrEP Uptake in High-Risk MSM Through Community- and Provider-Focused Interventions." MENTOR: Ann Avery, MD 
 
Vanessa Kung, University of Wisconsin-Madison. "Leveraging HIV Surveillance Data to Inform PrEP Implementation Among Young, Black Men Who Have Sex with Men." MENTOR: Ryan Westergaard, MD, PhD, MPH 
 
Bryna Harrington, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "Perinatal Depression, Retention in HIV Care, and Viral Load Suppression Among Malawian Women Enrolled in Option B+." MENTOR: Mina C. Hosseinipour, MD, MPH 
 
Gregory Damhorst, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Urbana. "Calculation of Community Viral Load as an Indicator for HIV Programs in Champaign County Illinois." MENTOR: Janet A. Jokela, MD, MPH 
 
Hazar Khidir, Harvard Medical School. "HIV Risk and Harm Reduction in the Periconception Period for Serodiscordant Couples in Durban, South Africa." MENTOR: Lynn Matthews, MD, MPH 
 
Maya Koretzky, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "Bedside Ethics, Provider Burnout, and Subsequent Career Trajectories: An Oral History of Interns and Residents at HIV Centers at the Height of the American Epidemic (1982-1986)." MENTOR: Robert Siliciano, MD, PhD 
 
Michael Scolarici, Saint Louis University School of Medicine. "Use of a Validated Risk Assessment Tool to Assess Additional Variables in the Risk of Progression to Active TB in Patients with HIV and Latent TB Infection." MENTOR: Soumya Chatterjee, MD 
 
Yanni Chang, University of Washington. "Focus Groups to Analyze Acceptability of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and Self-Testing Among Female Sex Workers in Pune, India." MENTOR: Ann Duerr, MD, PhD, MPH

Support IDSA Foundation Through CFC

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The IDSA Education and Research Foundation is happy to announce its participation in the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) for the second year running.
 
Inclusion in the CFC means that IDSA will gain greater visibility with individuals who work for the federal government and can elect to donate to IDSA. For more information about CFC, visit their website
 
The Foundation’s designated CFC number is 97049.
 
Support the future of ID!

ABIM Seeks Your Input on MOC Exams

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The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) has invited physicians to participate in a review of its exam blueprint in an effort to ensure that the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program reflects what physicians in practice are doing today. Participants are asked to rate the relative frequency and importance of individual topics in practice, one blueprint section at a time. For more information visit the ABIM website.

New CDC and Mass General Resource Helps Travelers Stay Healthy

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Whether it’s Zika virus, malaria, measles, or another health concern, Heading Home Healthy provides resources to help prepare international travelers. Supported by Global TravEpiNet, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the program works with travel agents and clinicians to provide travel advice to patients.

Antimicrobial Resistance: Persistence Pays Off With This Strategic Priority

For over a decade, IDSA has mobilized key leaders and resources around the issue of antimicrobial resistance. Through legislative, regulatory, advocacy, and public awareness efforts, we have brought together like-minded organizations and agencies to join in the fight. The recent discovery of colistin-resistant bacteria in a Pennsylvania woman is a reminder that there is still much work to be done. Here’s a brief look back (with an eye toward the future).

The discovery last month of colistin-resistant bacteria infecting a woman in Pennsylvania was disheartening and brought us one step closer to an eventuality that members of our field have been concerned about for many years: the day we have nothing left in our arsenal to fight drug-resistant bacteria. 

 
For a long time now, IDSA has mobilized key leaders and resources around this cause. Through legislative, regulatory, advocacy, and public awareness efforts, we have brought together like-minded organizations and agencies to join in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. Here’s a brief look back (with an eye toward the future): 
 
2002: While antimicrobial resistance was an area of focus for the Society from its inception, it is officially identified as a strategic priority. 
 
2004: The Society issues its landmark report, “Bad Bugs, No Drugs,” calling attention to a frightening twist in the antibiotic resistance problem that—until that time—had not received adequate attention from federal policymakers: The pharmaceutical pipeline for new antibiotics was drying up.
 
2006: Thanks in part to IDSA’s efforts, the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) is established and serves as the focal point within the Department of Health and Human Services to provide an integrated, systematic approach to the development of vaccines, drugs, therapies, and diagnostics for public health emergencies—including antimicrobial resistance.
 
2010: IDSA launches the 10 x ’20 Initiative, “Bad Bugs Need Drugs,” an advocacy campaign focused on one specific goal: to create an antibacterial research and development enterprise powerful enough to produce 10 new antibiotics by 2020. 
 
2011: The Society issues “Combating Antimicrobial Resistance: Policy Recommendations to Save Lives” to spur federal action on a range of issues, including antibiotic research and development, stewardship, surveillance, and data collection.
 
2012: The Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now (GAIN) Act is signed into law, providing incentives for drug development by extending the period of exclusivity for certain new antibiotics.
 
2014: IDSA convenes the Stakeholder Forum on Antimicrobial Resistance (S-FAR), a group of 85 like-minded organizations committed to advancing policies to address antimicrobial resistance. 
 
2015: President Obama issues the National Action Plan, which includes key IDSA priorities and benchmarks to assess progress, and establishes the Presidential Advisory Council, on which several IDSA leaders serve.
 
2016: IDSA’s Limited Population Antibacterial Drugs (LPAD) bill passes the full House of Representatives and the Senate Health Committee. The bill would allow antibiotics for the most deadly and highly resistant infections to be studied in smaller clinical trials and approved only for the limited populations of patients who most need them. 
 
2016: Our antibiotic and diagnostics tax credit bill (the Reinvigorating Antibiotic and Diagnostic Innovation [READI] Act) continues to gain bipartisan support. The bill would provide a much needed economic incentive for the most urgently needed new antibiotics and rapid diagnostic tests, which are crucial for guiding appropriate antibiotic use. 
 
2016: IDSA successfully leads advocacy for significant funding increases for antimicrobial resistance activities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, BARDA and other agencies. 
 
As of today, six of our 10 x ’20 new drugs have been approved, S-FAR now boasts over 110 partner organizations, and IDSA continues to push forward on LPAD, tax credits and other efforts. 
 
But that’s not the whole story. As ID doctors, we know that developing new drugs is but one aspect of fighting resistance. Of equal importance is protecting the drugs that we do have in our arsenal, and the key to that is antimicrobial stewardship. 
 
The recent proposals by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to require antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) as a Condition of Participation for acute care and critical access hospitals and long-term care facilities are major steps forward. IDSA has long been advocating that ASPs be required and has promoted that they be the standard of care for all health care facilities. We are at a critical juncture at which we as experts in infectious diseases, with our unique understanding of prescribing the right drug, at the right time for the appropriate duration, need to take a leadership role in stewardship. IDSA has a variety of resources online to prepare you for this role. 
 
These are all achievements to be celebrated, but, as the recent colistin-resistant case painfully illustrates, our work is not done and we must not slow down. The pipeline of new antibiotics is still fragile and woefully few pharmaceutical companies are engaged in research and development of these desperately needed new drugs. With the active engagement of our membership, we will continue to advocate for legislative solutions and for the critical role of the ID physician in stewardship. Now more than ever is the time to be a vocal advocate for the field of infectious diseases.

New IDSA Guideline on Diagnosis and Treatment of Aspergillosis

An updated IDSA guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of aspergillosis has been published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The updated guideline focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of the major forms of aspergillosis: allergic, chronic and invasive, the latter which kills 40 percent to 80 percent of those with widespread infection. According to the guideline, new therapies are improving care, but early diagnosis remains critical in the effective treatment of the potentially deadly fungal infection.

An updated IDSA guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of aspergillosis has been published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. According to the guideline, new therapies are improving care, but early diagnosis remains critical in the effective treatment of the potentially deadly fungal infection.

 
The updated guideline focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of the major forms of aspergillosis: allergic, chronic and invasive, the latter which kills 40 percent to 80 percent of those with widespread infection. While generally harmless, it can cause an allergic reaction or chronic lung problems in some people and serious, invasive disease in vulnerable patients. Those at highest risk are people whose immune systems are suppressed, such as those undergoing stem cell and lung and other organ transplants. The infection also can affect those with severe influenza or who are on long-term steroids, or patients in the intensive care unit. 
 
Improved use of diagnostic tools, including blood tests, cultures and CT imaging, have enhanced the ability to identify the infection early, but because some of the methods are invasive, physicians often are reluctant to proceed. Because the infection is so deadly, physicians should be aggressive in diagnosing patients suspected of having the infection, according to lead guideline author Thomas Patterson, MD, FIDSA. 
 
Additionally, new more-effective and better-tolerated antifungal medications, or versions of existing medications (e.g., extended release) have improved care, including isavuconazole and posaconazole. In some cases, combination therapy with voriconazole and an echinocandin is recommended for certain patients at highest risk. 
 
Because invasive aspergillosis is so deadly, the guidelines recommend some patients at highest risk be treated with antifungals to prevent infection, including those with neutropenia and graft versus host disease (GVHD). Another prevention strategy is the use of special filtration systems for hospitalized immunosuppressed patients. 
 
In addition to Dr. Patterson, the guidelines panel includes: George R. Thompson III, MD; David W. Denning, MD, FIDSA; Jay A. Fishman, MD, FIDSA; Susan Hadley, MD, FIDSA; Raoul Herbrecht, MD; Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis, MD, FIDSA; Kieren A. Marr, MD, FIDSA; Vicki A. Morrison, MD; M. Hong Nguyen, MD; Brahm H. Segal, MD, FIDSA; William J. Steinbach, MD, FIDSA; David A. Stevens, MD, FIDSA; Thomas J. Walsh, MD, FIDSA; John R. Wingard, MD, FIDSA; Jo-Anne H. Young, MD; and John E. Bennett, MD, FIDSA.

OPAT Handbook Now Available in Interactive, Digital Format

IDSA and CRG Publishing, a division of The Curry Rockefeller Group, LLC, have released the third edition of Handbook of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy for Infectious Diseases, which provides ID specialists the tools they need to set up and provide OPAT. For the first time, the resource is available as an eHandbook that allows for easy updates, access and review. The eHandbook covers topics including: infections amenable to OPAT, OPAT use in pediatrics, legal and reimbursement issues, and OPAT and health care reform.

IDSA and CRG Publishing, a division of The Curry Rockefeller Group, LLC, have released the third edition of Handbook of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy for Infectious Diseases, which provides ID specialists the tools they need to set up and provide OPAT. For the first time, the resource is available as an eHandbook that allows for easy updates, access and review. 

 
The interactive content provided in the handbook provides comprehensive guidance for practitioners providing parenteral antimicrobial therapy for patients in their homes or other non-hospital settings. The eHandbook covers topics including: infections amenable to OPAT, OPAT use in pediatrics, legal and reimbursement issues, and OPAT and health care reform. 
 
The OPAT eHandbook, edited by Akshay B. Shah, MD and Anne H. Norris, MD, is available for all mobile, tablet, and desktop devices wherever apps are sold. Support for the development of the eHandbook was provided by Allergan and The Medicines Company.

Donít Miss the Meeting Everyone Will be Talking About at IDWeek 2016!

Join a lively discussion with colleagues, learn about what IDSA and HIVMA are doing to promote the field of infectious diseases to medical students, residents, payers and policymakers, and contribute your opinions and ideas about the future of ID. We want to hear from YOU. Town Hall Meeting: Securing the Future of ID will be held on Friday, October 28 during IDWeek in New Orleans.

Coming to New Orleans for IDWeek 2016? You won’t want to miss the first-ever IDSA/HIVMA Town Hall Meeting: Securing the Future of ID being held Friday, October 28 at 6pm in the New Orleans Theater.

 
Join a lively discussion with colleagues, learn about what IDSA and HIVMA are doing to promote the field of infectious diseases to medical students, residents, payers and policymakers, and contribute your opinions and ideas about the future of ID. We want to hear from YOU. 
 
The Town Hall Meeting will feature short descriptions of the efforts and initiatives of IDSA and HIVMA by: 
 
Johan Bakken, MD, PhD, FIDSA, President, 
IDSA Carlos del Rio, MD, FIDSA, Chair, HIVMA 
Wendy Armstrong, MD, FIDSA, Chair, IDSA Recruitment Task Force  
Dan McQuillen, MD, FIDSA, IDWeek Chair, IDSA 
 
Then, join in the discussion with your colleagues in a question-and-answer style format!
 
To learn more, and to submit a question for the Town Hall, visit www.idweek.org/townhall.
 

 
Hear IDWeek Chair, Dan McQuillen, MD, FIDSA talk about the major challenges facing the field of ID and the goals of the Town Hall Meeting.