IDSA News - January 2018
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NIH Considers Next Generation Researchers Initiative Recommendations

IDSA continues to collaborate with National Institutes of Health on efforts to strengthen the infectious diseases physician-scientist workforce.

IDSA continues to collaborate with National Institutes of Health on efforts to strengthen the infectious diseases physician-scientist workforce. Leadership from IDSA, HIVMA, and PIDS last month discussed ID implementation and evaluation considerations for the Next Generation Researchers Initiative with Michael Lauer, MD, NIH Deputy Director for Extramural Research. Topics included: challenges facing ID physician-scientists during training, early career hurdles, and potential improvements to new and existing NIH programs. Society leadership expressed an interest in maximizing opportunities for ID physician-scientists under the policy and a continued willingness to partner with NIH.

At the December 15 NIH Advisory Committee to the Director meeting, the NGRI Working Group presented an overview of its work to date and outlined challenges and next steps. Several members expressed concern with NIH’s existing plan to allocate 400 additional grants per year for Early Stage and Early Established Investigators, as they believed that the definitions for each were arbitrary and risked excluding investigators who missed the cutoff due to life events (such as childbirth or extraprofessional obligations). In response, Principal Deputy Director, Lawrence Tabak, DDS, PhD, noted that while NIH is still aiming for 400 additional grants to younger and at-risk investigators this year, the agency will work to prioritize those investigators in “at risk” groups regardless of their designated status.

In its work since June, the Working Group has emphasized the need for predictive models that captures investigators at risk and has begun discussing evidence-based metrics for research productivity. Current policy goals include:

  • Protecting junior investigators for the future of the research workforce;
  • Stabilizing career trajectories of successful and productive mid-career investigators;
  • Understanding and mitigating unintended consequences;
  • Proposing rigorously vetted, evidence-based polices;
  • Designing robust mechanisms for ongoing monitoring and re-evaluation of policies.

Members expressed concern that there are no additional funds to implement the NGRI, potentially undermining the Initiative’s ability to succeed. IDSA will continue to advocate for increased NIH funding at the congressional level to help secure the future of the biomedical research workforce.

The Working Group’s goal is to provide recommendations that will enable sustainable implementation of the NGRI across all NIH Institutes and Centers. It will provide interim recommendations to the ACD in June 2018, followed by a final report in December. IDSA will continue to work with NIH to help inform their efforts to secure and optimize the ID physician-scientist workforce.

Online Database of C. diff Providers

The Peggy Lillis Foundation is the leading national organization focused on raising awareness of and advocating for people with Clostridium difficile infections.

The Peggy Lillis Foundation is the leading national organization focused on raising awareness of and advocating for people with Clostridium difficile infections. As part of its mission, the foundation hosts an online database of C. diff providers. PLF wants to create the most robust database possible for patients and caregivers seeking diagnosis and treatment for this dangerous infection. If you would like for you or your center to be included, please fill out their survey.

Why We Should be Concerned about Cuts to 340B Drug Pricing Program

Cuts by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to the 340B Drug Pricing Program will make it difficult for some health clinics and hospitals to continue to provide care to vulnerable and underserved patients.

Cuts by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to the 340B Drug Pricing Program will make it difficult for some health clinics and hospitals to continue to provide care to vulnerable and underserved patients. The cuts, which took effect on January 1, will reduce reimbursement for Medicare Part B drugs by nearly 30 percent for some participating hospitals.

The 340B Drug Pricing Program is a federal program that allows eligible health care organizations, such as federally-qualified health centers, Ryan White-funded clinics, other safety-net clinics and many hospitals, to purchase drugs at significantly reduced prices. Savings generated from these low prices allow organizations to better serve their communities by reaching more patients, providing comprehensive care, and funding additional wrap-around services for vulnerable populations.

IDSA and HIVMA released a joint statement outlining our concerns with these or any funding cuts to the 340B drug pricing program, which allows hospitals and clinics to provide high quality care to low-income, vulnerable and underserved patients with savings from reduced drug prices. Members of Congress have introduced bipartisan legislation which would preempt the implementation of this provision and continue 340B payments to hospitals for Medicare Part B drugs at current rates. IDSA and HIVMA urge Congress to support and pass this measure.

CMS Launches Data Submission System

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has launched a new data submission system for eligible clinicians participating in the Merit-based Incentive Payment System track of the Quality Payment Program. The data submission system aims to streamline data submission processes for the Quality, Improvement Activities, and Advancing Care Information performance categories as well as providing clinicians real-time initial scoring on the data they have uploaded into the new system.

Clinicians may start uploading their 2017 MIPS data now until the deadline, March 31, 2018, to avoid payment penalties for non-reporting.

IDSA has created a MIPS Data Submission Eligibility flow chart for members to determine if they are eligible to submit MIPS data using the new submission mechanism.

Science Speaks 2017 Wrap Up

Zika news Highlights Challenges Ahead

Science Speaks blog looked back on a year of changing approaches to U.S. global health leadership while reporting on Zika findings that point to new and persisting needs with:

A recap of 2017 policy and funding events affecting biomedical research and development, future directions of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and more;

A report on how Zika surveillance gaps in Angola preceded a rise in microcephaly cases there;

Coverage of early findings on long-term impacts of Zika on infants;

A summary of a case adding evidence to the possibility that Zika is transmitted through breast milk.

His Health Educational Resources: IDSA/HIVMA Accredited Courses

Deliver holistic, affirming, and uplifting care for Black LGBT patient communities with His Health's CME/MOC course series. The series is accredited by IDSA/HIVMA to offer medical professionals 1.0 hour of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ and 1.0 ABIM MOC (Maintenance of Certification) credit for each module completed.

His Health is an online resource inventory that provides expert-led modules centered on the unique health needs of young Black men who have sex with men (MSM). The platform provides proven and effective tools, models of care, and trainings to improve the health and wellness of Black MSM and transgender patients.

The courses offer ID physicians and other health professionals applicable tools and strategies to integrate both in and out of the clinical space to accelerate health services delivery to young Black MSM patients. The modules provide the support you need to engage and retain them in quality health care with a focus on:

  • STD/STI screenings and vaccinations
  • Mental Health
  • PrEP Access and Uptake
  • Linkage to Care
  • Transgender health

Free access to all modules can be found online.

Additional resources:

OFID Podcast: ID Diagnostic Test All-Star Draft

In the latest Open Forum Infectious Diseases (OFID) podcast, Editor-in-Chief Paul Sax, MD, faces off once again with Rebeca Plank, MD, MPH, following up on their antibiotics draft from 2017. This time, they select the best “team” of diagnostic tests in infectious diseases, with inventive picks ranging from blood cultures to HIV antibody tests. They also discuss their least favorite tests and new diagnostic capabilities they see on the horizon.

Check out the latest and previous OFID podcasts here: https://academic.oup.com/ofid/pages/podcasts

President's Message

Ralph Siu may be a name unfamiliar to most. He died twenty years ago, recognized as a distinguished American scholar, civil servant, and scientist who also spearheaded efforts years ago in food safety through irradiation. Dr. Siu was not a member of IDSA, but he did found the International Society for Panetics. This organization advocated for better recognition and quantitation of any suffering when making decisions as a method that would lead to improvements in the human condition. A management consultant and author, he sought to improve cooperation and efficiency in the workplace. Among Dr. Siu’s original quotes in this vein, speaking of any organization, “if you plant for a season, plant budgets. If you plant for a decade, plant reorganization. If you plant for a century, plant people.”

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Paul Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA
IDSA President

Paul Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA
IDSA President

Ralph Siu may be a name unfamiliar to most. He died twenty years ago, recognized as a distinguished American scholar, civil servant, and scientist who also spearheaded efforts years ago in food safety through irradiation. Dr. Siu was not a member of IDSA, but he did found the International Society for Panetics. This organization advocated for better recognition and quantitation of any suffering when making decisions as a method that would lead to improvements in the human condition. A management consultant and author, he sought to improve cooperation and efficiency in the workplace. Among Dr. Siu’s original quotes in this vein, speaking of any organization, “if you plant for a season, plant budgets. If you plant for a decade, plant reorganization. If you plant for a century, plant people.”

The Board of Directors and professional staff of IDSA have taken to planting for the year and the century by hewing to clear strategic priorities that help keep the Society on productive pathways. How we accomplish these priorities is continually examined as we also measure our success and communicate progress to you, our members. This is all driven by these six IDSA priorities:

  • Promoting the Value of the ID Specialist
  • Continually Attracting the Best and Brightest to ID
  • Promoting Leadership in Antimicrobial Resistance and Stewardship
  • Producing Relevant Guidelines
  • Promoting ID/HIV Research
  • Advocating for Funding for Public Health Programs in ID/HIV

What has never been planted is a floor to ceiling examination of the structural organization of IDSA since this seedling sprouted upon founding in 1963.

Last October, the IDSA Board of Directors approved the establishment of a Governance Task Force, charged with reviewing how well the current governance structure aligns with these priorities. Led by the goal-oriented leadership of IDSA Immediate Past President, Bill Powderly, MD, FIDSA, this volunteer task force is carefully examining key issues such as whether the current committees, their structure and associated processes are organized in the best way directly to support the work of IDSA under these priorities.

Another critical task force focus will center on diversity and inclusion, two ideals that are strongly supported by the Board of Directors. We view this commitment broadly, meaning that our Board of Directors and committees should reflect the depth of diversity within our membership, including race, ethnicity, gender, geographic location, and area of specialty.

In just a few short months, the task force has made significant progress including fielding a survey of past and current board and committee members as well as in depth member interviews.

Ensuring that the Society governance reflects our priorities and maximizes capabilities is more important than ever. With a prime emphasis on our diversity, the Society leadership is committed to complete transparency throughout nomination and election processes. The task force will present its initial findings at the March 2018 Board of Directors meeting with final recommendations at the June Board meeting. I look forward to sharing those recommendations and working with you to ensure that the Society reflects our priorities, our commitments, and our diversity.

Federal Funding Update

Your Voice Matters

IDSA member advocacy efforts remain essential for federal funding for ID/HIV priorities.

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IDSA member advocacy efforts remain essential for federal funding for ID/HIV priorities. The federal government is operating under a third Continuing Resolution through January 19, and a fourth CR may be needed through mid-February to allow lawmakers to complete work on a bipartisan budget agreement that averts across the board sequestration cuts and ensures increased spending caps. Congress must have a budget agreement in place to pass a separate FY2018 funding bill for all federal programs, including ID/HIV activities.

IDSA and HIVMA continue to press House and Senate members to make robust investments in federal ID and HIV program funding at the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Agency for International Development, and the State Department. We encourage you to weigh in with your members of Congress about need for lawmakers to pass a bipartisan budget agreement and a final FY2018 appropriations bill with full funding for ID/HIV programs.

The current CR also extended funding for a limited time for the Community Health Centers program, the National Health Service Corps, and Children’s Health Insurance Program. Unfortunately, the short extensions of these programs were paid for with $750 million from the Prevention and Public Health Fund, which provides more than 12 percent of the CDC’s funding and critical support for the Section 317 immunization program, efforts to address healthcare related infections, and epidemiology and laboratory capacity activities. Lawmakers are considering a multi-year renewal of the CHIP program, which could be attached to the next Continuing Resolution. IDSA and HIVMA are urging Congress to renew these programs without further cuts to the PPHF.

A third disaster relief supplemental funding package was not included in the current Continuing Resolution. IDSA and HIVMA continue to urge Congress to support additional resources to address areas hard-hit by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, particularly in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. Infectious diseases threats are a significant burden in the wake of these hurricanes.

Eligibility Criteria Now Available for LEAP Fellowship

IDSA, SHEA and PIDS are pleased to announce the eligibility requirements and application instructions for the LEAP Fellowship are now available on the IDSA website.

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IDSA, SHEA and PIDS are pleased to announce the eligibility requirements and application instructions for the LEAP Fellowship are now available on the IDSA website. The purpose of the LEAP Fellowship is to provide training for future ID leaders to help bridge the gap between clinical infectious disease institutions and public health departments. The intent for the Fellowship projects is to focus on antimicrobial stewardship and antibiotic resistance efforts. The LEAP Fellowship provides a flat $100,000 award for a 70 percent or greater commitment of time for one year.

It is open to ID physicians between their first year of Fellowship and up to two years post Fellowship. The on-line application portal is scheduled to be open for applications on January 26 and will be accessible from the IDSA website. The application deadline is March 5 and awards will be announced April 9 with Fellowships commencing July 1. For more information, contact Michele Wagner, MPH, LEAP Fellowship Project Manager, at mwagner@idsociety.org.

Journal Club

  • Sepsis Readmissions: Second Verse, Not the Same as the First
  • Increased Immune Activation in Patients with HIV and Long-term PPI Use
  • Probiotics for the Prevention of Neonatal Sepsis
  • Antibiotic Susceptibility Test Results in 30 Minutes: A View of the Future?
  • Oritavancin Noninferior to Vancomycin for Acute Bacterial Skin Infections

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In this feature, a panel of IDSA members identifies and critiques important new studies in the current literature that have a significant impact on the practice of infectious diseases medicine.

Here is the December version of Journal Club. For a review of other recent research in the infectious diseases literature, see “In the Literature,” by Stanley Deresinski, MD, FIDSA, in each issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Sepsis Readmissions: Second Verse, Not the Same as the First
Reviewed by Kelly Cawcutt, MD

Sepsis is a common cause of hospitalization. However, sepsis survivors often suffer from multiple post-sepsis complications including hospital readmission. Many of these readmissions are attributed to infection, yet it is largely unknown if the secondary infections are due to relapse or new infection. The authors of a recent article in Critical Care Medicine aimed to answer this question by studying a single-center, retrospective cohort of patients hospitalized with sepsis from 2013 to 2015.

Hospital readmissions were evaluated within the first 90 days of index hospitalization for sepsis readmission. Of 1,588 patients discharged with an index hospitalization of sepsis, there were 472 readmissions and 137 (29.1 percent) were due to sepsis. Of these, 68.6 percent had infection at the same anatomical location. Only 19 percent of the readmissions were identified as having both the same site and organism. The most common sites of infection were urinary (39.7 percent), gastrointestinal (18.0 percent), respiratory (15.9 percent), and skin and soft tissue (10.6 percent). Of the discordant sites, the most common were gastrointestinal and respiratory. There was a statistically significant decrease in Gram-positive infections among the readmissions (P = 0.03). About 30 percent were culture-negative. Among those with 90-day readmissions, there was a 21.2 percent mortality for sepsis readmissions compared to 10.5 percent for non-sepsis readmissions (P = 0.002).

Overall, approximately two-thirds of sepsis readmissions presented with infection at the same anatomic site, with the minority having definitive infection with the same organism, suggesting that it was not relapsed infection but perhaps new infections that resulted in readmission. Culture-negative sepsis comprised approximately one-third of these readmissions and may have been due to new infection, relapsed infection, or, possibly, noninfectious syndromes. Given the increased mortality in these patients readmitted with sepsis, further research on causation and strategies for preventing recurrent sepsis is needed.

(DeMerle et al. Crit Care Med. 2017;45(10):1702–1708.)

Increased Immune Activation in Patients with HIV and Long-term PPI Use
Reviewed by Lauren Richey, MD, MPH, FIDSA

Translocation of gut microbial products is a driver of immune activation. HIV infection has been associated with structural damage of the intestinal mucosa, leading to increased mucosal permeability. Additional alterations in the gut microbiota can worsen this damage. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) reduce stomach acid and have been shown in some studies to predispose to microbial overgrowth and alterations of the gut microbiome. Biomarkers which reflect innate immune activation include: activated CD8+ T-cells (CD38+HLA-DR+); lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacteria; LPS binding protein (LBP), which is induced by the presence of LPS; soluble CD14 (sCD14), which reflects monocyte activation; and intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), which reflects enterocyte turnover.

In a recent study in Clinical Infectious Diseases, the authors hypothesized that among patients living with HIV who have suppressed viral loads, long-term PPI use would result in bacterial overgrowth and immune activation. Study participants were male veterans with HIV and viral load suppression for at least 12 months. Participants were divided into two groups: those on long-term PPIs and those not taking acid suppression medication. Twenty healthy volunteers were also recruited.

Patients with HIV on long-term PPIs had statistically higher levels of sCD14 and LBP, but lower levels of I-FABP. They also had higher levels of LPS, which did not reach significance, and similar levels of activated CD8+ T-cells. Patients with HIV on long-term PPIs showed a median decrease of CD4 cells by 18 in the year prior to enrollment, whereas those not taking acid suppression medication showed an increase of 54 cells (P = .03). The healthy volunteers had significantly lower levels of sCD14, LBP, and activated CD8+ T-cells than either of the groups with HIV. These findings indicate increased innate immune activation in patients with HIV and long-term PPI use.

Although this is a small observational study, these findings show that PPIs may have negative consequences with long-term use. Further research is needed to quantify those consequences, particularly in patients living with HIV who may be more susceptible to gut microbial overgrowth and translocation.

(Serpa et al. Clin Infect Dis. 2017;65(10):1638–1643.)

Probiotics for the Prevention of Neonatal Sepsis
Reviewed by A. Krishna Rao, MD, MS

With improved global health initiatives over the past two decades, overall childhood mortality has declined but infant mortality remains high. Since neonatal sepsis still causes nearly 1 million deaths worldwide each year, even modestly effective interventions can have a large impact. Probiotics for sepsis prevention have been proposed but have not been well studied in neonates.

Probiotics are defined as “live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host.” Prebiotics are non-digestible sugar polymers that promote the growth of beneficial microbes and constitute a synbiotic when co-formulated with a probiotic. Prior studies on probiotics for the prevention of neonatal sepsis were small, heterogeneous in the formulations used, and/or did not show a benefit. Many did not use a preclinical, mechanistic approach to rationally design the probiotic formulation under study.

A more recent Nature study describes a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial assessing the Lactobacillus plantarum/fructooligosaccharide synbiotic for prevention of neonatal sepsis. This study of 4,556 infants was conducted in the state of Odisha in India, which has high infant mortality. Infants were randomized to start the 7-day course of the study drug or placebo on days 2–4 of life. The sepsis/death risk was 5.4 percent in the synbiotic arm, compared to 9 percent for the placebo group (number needed to treat = 27), and the treatment was well tolerated. Since this regimen costs $1 USD, the potential impact on neonatal sepsis in the developing world is great. Limitations include the inability to generalize results to preterm and low birthweight infants, who are among the highest risk for sepsis but were excluded.

Why do these results differ from previous studies? A possible explanation is the use of preclinical and early phase clinical data to choose the agent. L. plantarum was included based on its ability to colonize the infant gut long-term. It also adheres to gut mucosa, potentially interfering with bacterial translocation, and co-formulating it with fructooligosaccharide may potentiate its impact. Future studies on probiotics for infections and other conditions may benefit from a similar rational, ground-up approach.

(Panigrahi et al. Nature. 2017;548(7668):407-412.)

Antibiotic Susceptibility Test Results in 30 Minutes: A View of the Future?Reviewed by Michael T. Melia, MD

In the setting of suspected or confirmed infection, empiric antimicrobial therapy is administered pending drug susceptibility data that are often not available for several days. This reality is associated with uncertainty regarding the appropriateness of empiric therapy. While not yet ready for prime time, a recent publication in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences highlights the possibility of markedly accelerated drug susceptibility timelines.

The authors designed a microfluidic chip to capture individual Escherichia coli in two parallel rows of 2,000 cell traps. The higher the bacterial concentration, the greater the proportion of traps that filled within minutes; with a concentration of 10,000 cfu/mL, the authors state a sufficient number of traps fill within 5 minutes. They applied antibiotic-free medium to one row of cells and antibiotic-containing media to the second, and they compared the growth-rate characteristics of each of the traps. When the growth rates for the individual traps were averaged and normalized by the average growth rate of the reference population, differential growth rates were detected in as few as 3 minutes for agents including fluoroquinolones, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

They then tested 50 clinical isolates of uropathogenic E. coli and found that a ciprofloxacin-treated population grouped separately from an untreated reference population after 10 minutes; their results were 100 percent concordant with clinical microbiology laboratory disk diffusion test results. Including time needed to set up and run the test, total time until susceptibility results were available was as short as 30 minutes.

While this technology is not yet ready for clinical use—the chip used was designed to capture E. coli, polymicrobial infection and contaminants pose challenges, and the time until meaningful results were available was longer for K. pneumoniae and S. saprophyticus—it is nevertheless provocative to consider the game-changing aspects of this kind of technology.

(Baltekin et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 2017;114(34):9170-9175.)

Oritavancin Noninferior to Vancomycin for Acute Bacterial Skin Infections
Reviewed by A. Krishna Rao, MD, MS

Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSTIs) account for nearly 3 million U.S. emergency department visits and 870,000 inpatient admissions each year. Oritavancin is a semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic with activity against resistant Gram-positive pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. One dose is often sufficient treatment and could help avoid inpatient ABSSTI admissions.

In an Open Forum Infectious Diseases article, researchers provide a secondary analysis including only outpatients from the SOLO I and II clinical trials of oritavancin. These were identical multicountry, multicenter, randomized, double blind, noninferiority designs comparing one intravenous (IV) 1,200 mg dose of oritavancin to 7–10 days of twice daily IV vancomycin. Subjects included adults with ABSSTIs known or suspected to be from Gram-positive organisms. The primary endpoint was met when 1) there was cessation of spread of the baseline lesion, 2) fever was absent, and 3) no rescue antibiotic was needed. There were two main secondary endpoints: ≥ 20 percent reduction in lesion size and clinical cure as assessed by a clinician, both at the 48–72 hour visit.

Oritavancin met noninferiority criteria, with 80.4 percent meeting the primary endpoint versus 77.5 percent for vancomycin. Noninferiority was also met for the main secondary endpoints of clinical cure and reduction in lesion size. Among adverse events, notable differences were hypersensitivity reactions in 22.8 percent and 8.9 percent, and pruritus in 14 percent and 3.3 percent, for vancomycin and oritavancin, respectively. There were no notable differences in subgroup analyses.

This study has some limitations affecting its generalizability. The outpatients in the SOLO trials were younger, predominantly of white race, and had a higher prevalence of IV drug abuse and abscess. Additionally, the decision to treat in the outpatient setting was at the clinician’s discretion, which could have introduced bias towards noninferiority. In contrast, even the low rate of adverse events in the oritavancin arm could be an overestimate, since those patients came in twice daily for placebo injections. Overall, however, this trial shows outpatient oritavancin to be a compelling alternative to inpatient admission and treatment for ABSSTIs, which, as the study authors noted, cost between $6,000–$10,000, on average, per case, while outpatient treatment could save $2,500–$6,500 per patient.

(Lodise et al. Open Forum Infect Dis. 2017;4(1).)

For a review of other recent research in the infectious diseases literature, see “In the Literature,” by Stanley Deresinski, MD, FIDSA, in each issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases:

Jan. 15

  • Human Polyomavirus, Peacock Plumage, and Chronic Pruritic Dermatitis
  • Tedizolid, Linezolid, and Thrombocytopenia
  • Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis

Jan. 1

  • Plasmodium simium: Another Cause of Primate Malaria That Also Infects Humans
  • Liposomal Amphotericin B on Top: Visceral Leishmaniasis in Brazil
  • Case Vignette: Granulomatous Gastritis due to Aspergillus

Dec. 15

  • Brincidofovir and Adenovirus Viremia
  • Synbiotic Administration Is Associated With Dramatic Reduction in Neonatal Sepsis

Dec. 1

  • The Twain Have Met: Carbapenemase-Producing, Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae
  • Prevention of Gonorrhea With a Meningococcal Vaccine

Invest in Our Path Forward with the IDSA Foundation

Our Mission: To reduce the burdens of infectious diseases by advancing research, education, advocacy and patient care.

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Our Mission: To reduce the burdens of infectious diseases by advancing research, education, advocacy and patient care.

Our Vision: Our work focuses on four strategic priorities: to improve access to infectious disease doctors; to increase funding for infectious disease research; to raise public awareness about infectious diseases; and to be a valued source for all things ID.

Through research, education and training, and workforce development, the IDSA Foundation is working towards these goals. We thank you for your support and look forward to sharing more about the work of the Foundation throughout the year. To learn more about our programs and initiatives, email Simintha Esson, Chief Development Officer, at sesson@idsociety.org.